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Genesis 5: The World's First Navels

Curtis asks the question.




Seth wasn’t Adam’s last kid.  Adam was 130 when Seth was born, which means Seth was something of an afterthought.  Adam didn’t give much thought to the sons and daughters born after Seth, though, since no one has bothered to remember their names.  He probably had a lot more children, though, because if he was still virile at 130, he probably had more than a little life left in him between then and his death at age 930.

Seth, the third person in the world to have a navel (unless you count those other, unnamed people,) had a son named Enosh and a bunch of other children who weren’t named, and lived to be 912.  Enosh had one child of note, Kenan, and lived to be 905.  Kenan’s only noteworthy child was Mahalelel, and Kenan lived to be 910.  Mahalalael’s only noted child was Jared, Mahalalel lived to be 895.  Jared lived to be 962 and his only noted child was Enoch.  Enoch died young, at a mere 365 years, taken too soon from this earth to truly have lived a full life.  His only noted son was Methuselah, who made up for it by living to be the oldest person ever, sticking it out until age 969, bringing only one noteworthy child into the world: Lamech.  Lamech also died young, surviving a mere 777 years, and fathering only one noteworthy child, Noah.  Noah lived a long time, himself, but waited until he was just past middle age, at age 500, to father three boys: Shem, Ham and Japheth.  But, strangely enough, that’s not the remarkable story that Noah is famous for.

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