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Genesis 7: Noah Gathers Green Alligators and Long-Necked Geese

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No one born after Noah's age has ever substantiated a claim that they've seen a unicorn.

God made his point again that He thought Noah and his family were the only ones on the earth who weren’t worth killing.  God then averted certain extinction of many species by clarifying that by two of each species, He meant one male and one female.  It took a while to build the ark, so Noah was 600 years old when it was ready and the floods were coming.  Gathering the animals was hard work, too, as must have been making them all stay still and not wander off while waiting for the ark to be finished and for Noah to come back with more animals.  To gather all the animals, Noah must have had to travel far, but how he got to southern Africa, eastern Asia, Australia and the Americas is not recorded in Genesis.

The flood started and Noah ordered all the animals into the ark, along with his wife and three boys (who were the only creatures on the ark not paired up with a member of the opposite sex.)  All the people and animals drowned as the flood started, lasting for forty days and covering every last bit of land on earth by a depth of fifteen cubits.  To make sure everything was really dead, God kept the world flooded for another five months.  No one has seen a unicorn since.


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